Luther's Reform of the Church and the University Online Video

The videos below bring subject-matter experts from Emory and elsewhere to describe the significance of some of the items in the exhibit. These videos can also be accessed in the gallery. We invite visitors to use smartphones or tablets to snap the QR codes in the cases or on the printed guides to access and download the exhibit catalog or to explore topics in greater detail via the in-depth resources provided. An interactive console is located at the rear of the gallery.

Links to Video:




Joanna Lindell, Curator, Collection of Religious Art at Thrivent Financial, introduces an important woodcut portrait of Martin Luther by Hans Baldung Grün in 1521. Lindell explores the importance of images in the Reformation, and places this work in the context of other images of Luther, explaining the significance of particular depictions of Luther’s image.

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Emory Professor of Classics Garth Tissol explains the significance of the Pitts editions of Isocrates’ Orations, owned and annotated by Hieronymus Wolf, the most significant editor of Isocrates in the 16th century.

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KU Leuven Church Historian Wim Francois discusses the response of the theologians at the University of Leuven to Luther's works.

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Professor Ian McFarland of Emory University’s Candler School of Theology provides an introduction to the form and function of the Medieval Bible, using Pitts Theology Library’s Glossed Vulgate, published in 1498. He shows the layout of the Biblical text, surrounded by patristic and medieval exegesis. Dr. McFarland highlights how different the experience of reading this Bible is from the way modern readers encounter the Biblical text. He discusses the development of the form of the Bible during the time of the Protestant Reformation.

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Professor Jonathan Strom of Emory University’s Candler School of Theology discusses Martin Luther’s 1524 open letter "To the Councilmen of All Cities in Germany,” in which Luther argues for the value of liberal learning in Germany. Working through Pitts Theology Library’s copy of the letter, Dr. Strom highlights Luther’s argument for the liberal education of boys and girls as preparation not only for a good Christian life, but also a good civic life.

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Armin Siedlecki, Head of Cataloging at the Pitts Theology Library, explains the significance of Johannes Reuchlin’s Fundamentals of Hebrew, published in 1505. Dr. Siedlecki discusses the background of Reuchlin’s training in Hebrew language and literature, and he places this important work within the context of Christian views of Judaism in the early 16th century.

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Professor Jacob Wright, of Emory University’s Candler School of Theology, introduces the Rabbinic Bible, showing Pitts Theology Library’s first two printed editions, published in 1517 and 1524. Dr. Wright discusses the significance and influence of these two Bibles, demonstrating the innovative ways in which the Biblical text was presented, surrounding by rabbinic commentary.

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Professor Timothy J. Wengert, Ministerium of Pennsylvania Emeritus Proessor of the History of Christianity at Lutheran Theological Seminary, introduces the life and work of Philipp Melanchthon, the 16th-century humanist and Lutheran theologian. Wengert discusses how Melanchthon made contributions both to the study of classic languages and texts, as well as to the burgeoning reformed theologican movement.

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Professor Jonathan Strom of Emory University’s Candler School of Theology introduces Philipp Melanchthon’s 1561 German Exam for Ordination, showing the copy owned by the Pitts Theology Library. Dr. Strom contextualizes this work as a part of the second generation of the Protestant Reformation. He highlights the specific form of Melanchton’s questions of candidates and discusses the influence of this work, arguing it becomes the standard for ordination exams in the 16th century.

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Professor Stephen A. Crist, of Emory University’s Department of Music, introduces Pitts Theology Library’s copy of the Achtliederbuch, the first Lutheran hymnal, published in 1524. Dr. Crist introduces (and sings!) the contents of the book, exploring the influence of this early work on congregational singing in Protestant traditions.

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